Sennyuji temple
Sennyuji temple is located at the foot of Mt. Tsukinowa in the Higashiyama area in Kyoto. The origin of this temple, which is familiar to citizens by the name "Mitera," can be traced back to the Tencho era (824-834) when Priest Kobo founded a small temple in the place. That small temple, which was first called by the name, Horinji, and later, Sen' yu-ji, was remarkably enlarged by Priest Tsukinowa Shunjo in 1218. Large temple buildings were built in the contemporary Chinese style of the Song dynasty, and the temple was renamed after the clear water which began to flow from its precinct-Sennyuji (temple of flowing fountain).
 Priest Shunjo entered the priesthood as a young man. He went to China during the Song dynasty to study Buddhist thoughts. After returning to Japan, he turned Sennyuji into a prosperous temple, by covering four schools of Buddhism in the temple: Shingon esoteric Buddhism. The temple was supported by the Imperial family, who were pious Buddhists. Since the burial of the Emperor Shijo in this temple in 1242, the mausoleum of several succeeding emperors were built in this area, with this temple playing the role of a mourning temple of the Imperial family. The scenic temple precinct includes the Butsu-den (Buddha's hall), the Shari-den (relic's hall), the Reimei-den for the repose of the late emperors, and other building.

Reimei-denReimei-den
 Today's building of the Reimei-den was reconstructed by the order of the Emperor Meiji in 1884. Roofs are covered with cypress-barks and structured in the Irimoya-zukuri (hipped and gabled) style. The building is designed in the Shinden palace style. The building consists of the Naijin, Chujin, and Gejin sections: the naijin section was made as a palace with five rooms. This Reimei-den has a close relationship to the Imperial family, and several succeeding emperors, starting from the Emperor Tenji, are enshrined in it. The interior decorations have been donated by the Imperial family since the Meiji period.

Butsu-den & Shari-denButsu-den & Shari-den
 Today's building of the Reimei-den was reconstructed by the order of the Emperor Meiji in 1884. Roofs are covered with cypress-barks and structured in the Irimoya-zukuri (hipped and gabled) style. The building is designed in the Shinden palace style. The building consists of the Naijin, Chujin, and Gejin sections: the naijin section was made as a palace with five rooms. This Reimei-den has a close relationship to the Imperial family, and several succeeding emperors, starting from the Emperor Tenji, are enshrined in it. The interior decorations have been donated by the Imperial family since the Meiji period.

Buddha's TriadBuddha's Triad
 Statues of the Buddha's Triad-Sakyamuni, Amitabha, Avalokitesvara--, which are attributed to sculptor Unkei, are placed in the Naijin section of the Butsu-den. People worship these these images, wishing for peace and happiness of the past, present, and future, as well as eternal prosperity.

Empress Yang-AvalokitesvaraEmpress Yang-Avalokitesvara
 Empress Yang is known as a wife of the Emperor Xuan Zong of the Tang dynasty and also as a exquisite beauty of the history. When she died, the Emperor missed her very much and had her sculpture made I an image of Avalokitesvara, which was brought to this temple by Priest Tankai in 1255. The beauty and holiness of the statue has been attracting worshippers.

GozashoGozasho
 The building of today's Gozasho was originally one of the building of the Imperial Palace, which was moved into the temple precinct by the order of the Emperor Meiji when the Reimei-den of the temple was reconstructed. Six rooms are in the western section of this building by the porch. The room in the south-east was an Emperor's room, and the one in the north-east was used for empress's childbirth. The floor of the emperor's room is higher than those of other rooms, and a characteristic shelf is equipped. The Emperor Kokaku's mulberry-wood desk is placed in the center of the room.

Kaie-doKaie-do
 The building of the Kaie-do was also moved from the Imperial Place. Personal tutelary icons of several emperors and other imperial family members are enshrined here. AS those images were made by skillful sculptors, they are all excellent art objects.